With unity comes strength and resilience

In celebration of World Social Work Day, Rachel, Elizabeth and Jeanne (from left to right) from the Ministry of Social and Family Development, share their story of how they helped a pair of young siblings overcome childhood trauma, and eventually reunite with their father.


Social work may be tough, but it is where you see the most positivity, strength, and resilience in life.

Anna (not her real name) had been providing foster care to a pair of young siblings, who were victims of severe childhood trauma. The children’s father, John (not his real name), who was their only kin at that point in time, was unable to care for them.

Initially, the siblings had trouble getting used to living with Anna in a structured environment. The young siblings, who were only 3 and 4 years old then, could not cope with their emotions and displayed signs of aggression due to the intense trauma that they experienced.

There were times where Anna found it challenging to guide the kids well. That was when foster care officer Jeanne stepped in to provide support for Anna and taught her about the effects of childhood trauma. Together with Jeanne, clinical psychologist Elizabeth helped Anna work through her anxieties and taught the siblings skills to stabilise their emotions.

At the same time, child protection officer Rachel worked with John to stabilise his job and living arrangements. She also worked on strengthening his parenting skills, hoping to eventually reunite John with his children. The team subsequently linked the father with a Family Service Centre to build up his support network, which he lacked.

In the months that followed, Rachel, Elizabeth and Jeanne worked closely to best support Anna, and put in extra effort and hours to reconnect the children with John more frequently. They also took time to meet the children’s school and student care personnel regularly to help them understand the children’s past traumatic experiences and how to respond to their current behaviours.

Their hard work eventually paid off. John was able to pick up good parenting habits and play the role of a committed caregiver for his children. Rachel, Elizabeth and Jeanne were pleased to see that the kids were well-fed with John cooking for them on a regular basis. Most importantly, they were glad that the kids were happy and safe.

Soon after the siblings returned to John, the team organised a get-together with the family and Anna’s family. It was a heart-warming gathering, and John acknowledged Anna’s instrumental role in providing a stable, nurturing environment for his children.

“While we were doing different things, we were all on the same page, and could be confident in making decisions with the support from our team. Learning from each other has also helped in the work that we do,” Jeanne said.

Reflecting on the journey of helping the two siblings, Elizabeth said: “We are proud to be able to ‘graduate’ them from MSF’s help. There is nothing is like going home.”

Rachel echoed the sentiment. “Many times, it is the people and the work that keep us going. We are really happy when we see children and families reunite,” she said.

Fostering Innovation In Social Work Practice

An interview with the Director of Social Welfare, Ms Ang Bee Lian on the topic, ‘Fostering Innovation in Social Work Practice’, for World Social Work Day.


q1

Innovation involves looking inward and outward. Inwards, to reflect on our services, interventions, work processes etc. and to rethink about what we do and whether there are any areas of improvement or new ways of doing things. Outwards, to learn from best practices, to build upon the ideas of others both within the sector and beyond, and to tailor them to the relevant contexts.

Sometimes, we may think that innovations should mainly happen in the realm of science and technology and not so much in the social work setting.

We should however think of innovations as part of social work where we can find alternative ideas or solutions to improve the living conditions and well-being of individuals, families and communities.

q2

The perception that innovation is too difficult and irrelevant to the profession might be the main obstacle. Some may even identify innovation as only for the creative or brainy. Innovation is more about having a spirit of curiosity about the issues that we deal with and to explore how else these issues could be addressed. It requires us to be willing to step out of our daily tasks and routines, to relook and analyse with others on how to approach these issues in a different manner. We need to move away from the status quo and ask “what if” questions e.g. what if processes were “packaged” in a different way or what if our assumptions about particular human behaviours were wrong. Having a spirit of curiosity would constantly push us to question and to find the answers or new perspectives on the situations we face.

q3

To promote innovative practices, we need to start with developing a spirit of enquiry and learning. The management would play a key role in fostering such a culture by creating an open and supportive environment where employees can share new ideas and initiatives, build upon current ideas and be receptive to collaborate with various stakeholders. Likewise, the management could listen to their employees and take relevant ideas into consideration.

In recent years, there has been a growing interest in evidence-based practice where social workers look at best possible evidence to inform them as to what works. Evidence-based practice also requires a spirit of questioning to find “evidence” on whether the current solutions work and if things should be done in a different manner. It is not about throwing away our current processes and programmes but to look at what works, to keep what works and to try new approaches and ways that offer solutions and positive outcomes to our clients’ issues.

Innovation can start in small ways, but goes a long way in growing professionals who would constantly look for new and better ways of addressing social issues.


Happy World Social Work Day!

Know a social worker? Take some time today to show your appreciation to the social workers in our midst!

MSF Budget 2017

How are we working towards building a more caring Singapore?

Minister Tan Chuan-Jin and Parliamentary Secretary Assoc Prof Muhammad Faishal Ibrahim share about some of MSF’s latest Budget announcements in this video.

For more details, visit MSF’s Budget Page.

A brief overview of MSF’s work 2016

Whether it is to support families, foster a more inclusive Singapore, or provide a good start for every child, MSF will continue to work to nurture a resilient and caring society that can overcome challenges together.

Here are some of what MSF has done in 2016:

msf2016-strengtheningfamilies

Families are the building blocks of our society. That’s why we believe that having strong families is key to our nation’s progress.

Find out more:
Safe and Strong Familes Pilot: http://tinyurl.com/SSFpilot
Marriage Preparation Programme: http://tinyurl.com/marriageprogrammes
Positive Parenting Programme: http://tinyurl.com/TriplePPilot
Lasting Power of Attorney (LPA): http://tinyurl.com/LPAFeeWaiver

msf2016-inclusivesociety

Building a society that supports those who come from less-advantaged backgrounds and those living with disabilities is important to us.

Find out more:
ComCare Assistance: http://tinyurl.com/ComCareAssistance
SHARE as One: http://tinyurl.com/SHAREasOne
Recommendations for 3rd Enabling Masterplan: http://tinyurl.com/Recommendations3EM

msf2016-goodstartforchildren

Our children are the nation’s future, and having a strong start in life will enable them to reach their potential in adulthood.

Find out more:
Baby Bonus scheme: http://tinyurl.com/BabyBonusScheme
KidSTART: http://tinyurl.com/KidSTARTpilot
Early Childhood Manpower Plan: http://tinyurl.com/EarlyChildhoodManpowerPlan
Amendments To The Child Development Co-Savings Act: http://tinyurl.com/AmendmentsToCDCA