Staff profile: Giving hope through social assistance

Limin provides social assistance as a Manager at SSO@Bukit Merah, and works together with agencies in the community to meet the needs of her client holistically.


“How much is enough, and how much is too much?”

As a Social Assistance Officer, Limin often faces the dilemma of striking the balance for every client. She has to consider the needs of her clients in providing financial assistance, but at the same time ensure that she helps to preserve individual resilience and foster self-reliance.

Mdm Ang (not her real name) first came to Limin on financial issues she faced as a part-time working mother raising 2 teenage children. It was seemingly a simple issue where Limin would assist Mdm Ang to seek full-time employment while providing her with short-term assistance.

However, it soon evolved into a multi-faceted challenge within a matter of months. Mdm Ang’s younger son dropped out of secondary school, and her older son married his pregnant girlfriend Clara (not her real name) while he was still serving National Service.

With major changes to the family’s situation, Limin had to come up with an entirely new action plan to better support Mdm Ang with her changed circumstances.  “From seeking employment for Mdm Ang, it became having Mdm Ang look after the newborn child, while we found Clara a job to support the family,” Limin recalled.

Knowing that Mdm Ang had been linked up with a Family Service Centre (FSC), Limin worked closely with the FSC social worker to coordinate support for her in meeting her various needs.

Although there were minor hiccups along the way when Clara left her first job, she eventually sustained a stable employment with help and encouragement from Limin and the FSC social worker. Clara also started becoming more willing to learn how to care for her baby.

The family managed to maintain sufficient income after about a year, and it was heartening for Limin when Mdm Ang said that the family wanted to try coping on their own without relying further on financial assistance.

There were times along the way when Limin felt at a loss as issues evolved, but she was encouraged when she saw significant improvements to the life of the family.

“I’m glad that I could work with other agencies to go in-depth into the different issues that my clients face. Seeing each case through from start till end, I am able to witness how financial assistance in a calibrated manner can positively impact them,” she said. “It reminds me of the meaning of my job, and that it is all worth it when I see how it makes a difference in their lives.”

If you are interested to pursue a meaningful career at MSF, find out more information here or view available job listings here.

Realising Women’s Full Potential

It was a robust debate in Parliament last week where many came forward to support and help women achieve their aspirations.

Glad that there are efforts by different ministries to support women. MOE has plans to reach out to back-to-work-moms to ensure they get the appropriate training for their careers. MOH is looking into a range of support initiatives to give caregivers a break. MOM is increasing efforts to raise adoption of flexible work arrangements to encourage more women to return to work.

I spoke about the need to eliminate barriers for women in our workplace and community, as well as making changes at home. For working parents, MSF is increasing the number of child care places, and will add another 10,000 places by early next year. It is important for fathers to play a part and share responsibilities at home too. Whether it is sharing chores or parenting duties. They can be the role models for the next generation that we all need. We have also reviewed policies to help single mums — their children are also now eligible for a Child Development Account.

Our laws have made Singapore a safer place for women, however we cannot take it for granted and should do more. The ongoing review of the issue of marital immunity for rape is timely. I strongly believe that a married woman should not have any less protection against sexual violence than an unmarried woman. We will give an update once the review is completed.

Singapore has come a long way in the progress of women in our society, but we can certainly do more. I hope these efforts give Singaporean women the opportunity to achieve their fullest potential.

Read more about my speech here.

Please refer to the Diversity Action Committee’s press release for more information on the target to have 30% of women on boards of SGX-listed companies by 2030.