Curating needs-driven help in the social sector

The following is an excerpt from Minister Tan Chuan-Jin’s opening speech at the Eagles Leadership Conference 2017 at Suntec Convention Centre.

Eagles Leadership Conference has been encouraging many of the companies to come together to collaborate and to do good. I thought it’s useful before we proceed, to actually ask ourselves, and to remind ourselves again – why is it the right thing to do? We assume we know that this is the correct thing, but we should pause, and ask ourselves why is it so fundamentally important? How do you talk about this at the national level, where as individual Singaporeans, we begin to look beyond self?

We can put up the rhetoric about being a caring and inclusive society, but the question is: What do you do about it? It’s easy to talk, but we must be able to break it down into bite-sized chunks that we can do. If we believe that it is fundamentally important, then we have to ask ourselves, what can we do? Which is where it comes back to where we started from – this desire to do good.

The social sector is about bringing people on board, and being involved. And that’s where I think we can begin building a very different society. So what do we do? There are basically three buckets that I’m looking at.

Schools – Nurturing every child to desire to do good

Firstly, schools. Imagine the vision where it is possible for us to nurture in every child who leaves the education system with a desire to do good, to want to care for others. Is it possible?

Last week, I visited Bedok View Secondary School. They partnered Katong APSN to cook together with students with special needs during recess time. When I talk to the students and read the reflections of those who have participated in these activities, you know that there has been a change. They learn to care for others, to be more patient. You find that true of many other equivalent activities. Could we work with the schools so that we programme more of these activities? If you curate programmes like Values-In-Action well, you can imagine how this could have a significant impact.

Corporates – Providing opportunities to do good together

Secondly – Corporates. In the corporate world, many of us are increasingly beginning to build more social responsibility. It is important to remind ourselves why it is so fundamentally important. We know that many young people desire to do good, but they don’t always find those opportunities. A recent survey by NVPC pointed out that 50 per cent of companies do provide such opportunities. The overall participation is about 41 per cent for those under 25 years old – it can increase, and I think it should increase. By the 25-34 age group, there is a dip to 29 per cent. After school, they enter the workforce, they have other distractions. This is where we should try again to work within this space, pull the different groups together to collaborate. What other activities do you have to bring employees together to do something meaningful together? Imagine doing this as a company, with your department, the relationships will go deeper, because we are engaging in an activity that is fundamentally different. That happens with the students in school. That can happen with a corporate entity as well.

Community – Coordinating efforts for more needs-driven help

The third bucket is the local community. If you can coordinate volunteerism among neighbours, where they visit elderly folks or those with special needs within the same block of flats, it strengthens neighbourly ties. When you talk about nation-building itself, it sounds very deep, but it comes down to relationships. There is a virtuous cycle that builds on itself, at school, at work, at home. We begin to come together to collaborate, being more needs-driven, rather than creating projects.

How can we begin to look at longer-term partnerships, curate and meet real needs, and do preventive work? When we begin to organise ourselves, when we begin to hub, when we begin to share information and understand the needs, there’s a tremendous amount of good we can do. But more importantly, I think it has a tremendous impact on who we are as individuals.

Facilitating volunteerism between companies and social service organisations

Let me cite you some examples on how we can facilitate volunteerism more conveniently. NCSS, for example, has piloted a new service-based volunteerism model. So volunteers can come into direct contact with beneficiaries, and partner to work with them on a regular basis. Corporate organisations are valuable because they will organise their volunteers and volunteering schedule.

The Japanese Association, for example, have been volunteering with MINDS regularly for 20 to 30 years. Basically what happens is that the afternoon programme for that day is settled, and MINDS can free up their trained staff to do the complex work, which we as average volunteers are not able to do. This allows our VWOs to expand their capacity without necessarily getting help. So we want to curate that experience, expand the partnership.

Another example, SP Group volunteers at the Senior Activity Centre in Geylang Bahru, which is under Touch Community Services. They conduct morning exercises for the elderly and serve them breakfast. This partnership with 20 staff from SP Group began in February 2017. The elderly residents clearly find some of these faces familiar, because of the regularity, and look forward to meeting some of them. The volunteers from the group reported a higher sense of morale and satisfaction.

POSB Bank has embarked on a service-based volunteering model. Staff from 4 branches, located in Jurong, started their volunteering session in May with NTUC Health Nursing Home. About 20 employees per session befriend elderly residents, who would otherwise would have little contact with the community. Many of them will volunteer early in the morning before they go to work, and the banks, where possible, adjust to make sure that there’s flexible time.

I would also encourage you to consider the programme Share As One. Many of you in Singapore will know what it is, where we commit a dollar or two a month from our paycheck to Community Chest. Even for my own ministry, we have made it opt-out. Everybody, as a default, will contribute. You can opt-out if you wish to. Companies are sometimes wary about doing this, but you will be surprised. There is actually a very positive response to it. It may not seem much, but it makes a lot of difference when you ensure that there is a steady stream of funds to the Community Chest – where every single dollar goes to beneficiaries. With the Share As One programme, what we will do is to look at your contributions as a company, whatever additional you are able to bring to bear, we will match that and we will also provide funding to your company to fund your company’s activities. So I do encourage you that as we embark on trying to broker, and trying to structure better programmes, participate in the Share As One Programme as well, so that funds can also come in.

Building a different Singapore, step by step

Perhaps the theme for this conference is about what we can be and do as better leaders. This is what I put to you as you think about leadership, how by embracing some of these activities in the right spirit, you can actually make a tremendous amount of difference. I would urge you to do more, step up and curate the journey. Step by step, individual by individual, we begin to change. Society will change. And we will build a very different Singapore.

 

Raising Support for Social Good

By raiSE

Thinking of ways to help those in need through your business model?

A social enterprise may be the answer. This model can generate revenue and fulfil social needs at the same time. Think about it – you can provide jobs to the disadvantaged, or offer subsidised goods or services to those in need.

Last May, a centre for social enterprises was set-up. Here are 5 things you should know about this new Centre and what it does!

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   1. It’s got an inspiring name

This Centre is called raiSE, which was named from its mission: to raiseawareness, and raisesupport for the social enterprise (SE) sector.

raiSE hopes to strengthen the social enterprise sector in Singapore, and encourage the growth of social enterprises as a sustainable way to address social needs.

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  1. It’s got the President’s support.

That’s President Tony Tan at raiSE’s official launch in May last year. (Check out pictures from the event here – and while you’re there, ‘Like’ our Facebook page!)

  1. It’s located in the hip part of the West.

You can find raiSE at JTC Launchpad@one-north, a vibrant community at the heart of Singapore’s entrepreneurship ecosystem.

Here, social enterprise start-ups can plug into one-north’s multi-disciplinary R&D and international business environment.

At the same time, entrepreneurs can benefit from interacting with the range of different  social enterprise start-ups in their midst.

  1. It encourages you to #VentureforGood

VentureForGood is raiSE’s open call for all new and existing locally based social enterprises to submit their innovative ideas. Selected social enterprises get a grant from raiSE to kickstart their ideas.

And this was attractive. The first round of the grant call (July to September 2015) saw a total of 162 applications!

Keep a lookout for the second round of VentureForGood at: https://www.raise.sg/ventureforgood/

  1. It will invest in you.

Besides grant funding, raiSE also offers investments to mature social enterprises looking to expand their business activities.

This will help such social enterprises create more impact, and do more good!

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Are you a social enterprise in Singapore and unsure of where to seek support? Contact raiSE at info@raise.sg and meet with the team!